Persian Shield is Purplelicious

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If you haven’t been introduced or seen the annual, Persian Shield, you are missing out on one of the most amazing purple colored foliage plants to use in container gardens.

Persian Shield by C Testa Copywrite_0003

Persian shield (Strobilanthes dyerianus) enjoys full to part sun and will grow to about 18-36″ tall. It has an upright habit, makes an excellent filler, and is an annual plant except for zones 9-11. In CT, we are zone 6.

Persian Shield by C Testa Copywrite_0007

In a part sun situation, under patio umbrellas, these plants performed beautifully this season for me at home. However, I also have installed them in full sun situations at client sites (photos on those later) this year, and they performed equally well because they are heat tolerant too. I guess you could say, this plant is very versatile.

Persian Shield by C Testa Copywrite_0002

As a container garden installer, sometimes I will have some left over plants and assemble them at home in random fashion. Thus, this year, I put together 3 plants you may not consider would “work well” together for design purposes, but they did. They were a darker variety of rubber plant, Persian Shield, and mint.

Persian Shield by C Testa Copywrite_0006

The mint served as a cascading spiller (and was handy to cut from for summer cocktails), the rubber plant served as the large and tall thrillers, and the Persian Shield was the filler (and is of a perfect height with the rubber plant which grew taller).

Persian Shield by C Testa Copywrite_0005

I tend to enjoy foliage plants over flowering. Foliage lasts a long time (still going strong right now in mid-September) and adds a great deal of texture. In the case of Persian Shield, it has the narrow shaped leaves with pointy ends and the leaf veins and the somewhat ruffle texture on the leaf itself gives it a sense of ambiance.

Persian Shield by C Testa Copywrite_0001

These two patio pots with Persian Shield graced the steps leading to the top level of my deck. When friends came by, they always stopped to not only comment on the Persian Shield’s coloring and beauty, but they also would reach down to touch the leaves with their finger tips. This is a true sign of a plant that is captivating.

The rubber plant’s darker toned and larger sized leaves gave the Persian Shield’s coloring a bit more impact but this plant also pairs well with softer colors, like pinks or softer purples, which is a combination I put together at a client’s full sun patio site this season (and will show photos of that combo later).

I have found the coloring of Persian Shield is best in the part-sun situations, but I would never limit it to only part sun. It tolerates the full sun situations. I watered these two pots regularly and the soil remained moist most times, although one should always be sure to not over water anything to the point of soggy. The nice thing about Persian Shield is it can take low water use as well. Again, easy and versatile.

This plant may be overwintered as a house plant, which I have not done myself, or you may take tip cuttings to root in water and hopefully keep it going to replant next season, or just run to the nursery in the spring time to get some more because Persian Shield is worth it.

In a future post, I will share more photos of how I used this plant and post about the rubber plants used in these combinations soon. They have an interesting story to go with them. 

In the meantime, enjoy the purplelicious nature of this wonderful primarily foliage plant (Note: It does bloom light purple flowers eventually but they are not very showy).

Thank you,

Cathy Testa
Container Crazy CT
860-977-9473
Broad Brook, CT

P.S. The beautiful photos in this post were taken by JMSArtandPhoto

‘Black Pearl’ Pepper – A Little Too Hot to Eat – Great in Containers!

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One year, I ordered a stock of this pepper plant with purplish black and dark green foliage from a local Connecticut grower. It grows black pearl-like small peppers which are shiny and pretty. But what attracted me to it more was the foliage’s dark toned colors.

Black Pearl Pepper in a Pot - Great Contrasting Foliage Color

Black Pearl Pepper in a Pot – Great Contrasting Foliage Color

So, I included one in a mixed container garden with some of my Canna plants that year.

Today, mixing edibles with other types of plants is a common trend, but years ago, not too many people would see a pepper plant with a tropical plant in a pot, so it was fun to see people’s reactions.

Black Pearl Pepper Descipt

This pepper starts out with small purple flowers which you may miss if you don’t notice them, and then transitions to developing black peppers which later mature to an intense bright red color. This was a bonus in my book. Not only was the foliage a nice dark contrasting color, the show of the peppers changing color was fun to witness.

Veins of Coleus 'Gay's Delight' pick up the purple tones of 'Black Pearl' pepper.

Veins of Coleus ‘Gay’s Delight’ pick up the purple tones of ‘Black Pearl’ pepper.

You can easily echo the purple-black foliage by including other plants with similar tones or colors. In this example, you see how Coleus ‘Gay’s Delight’ has veins in the same color. It worked, not only because of the color-echo, but the yellow or chartreuse color of the Coleus is opposite to purple on the color wheel, so it was complementary.

Another way to use this plant is to pot it up with other purples. You can see how well Strobilanthes dyerianus (Persian Shield), shown below on the top right, with its striking silver purple leaves would work with the ‘Black Pearl’ pepper. Even a perennial has the capability to bring it all together with the purples.

Monochromatic

Monochromatic

Tomorrow, I host another Container Garden Workshop and I have some of these plants available for inclusion in the pots which our attendees will be potting up. Along with many perennials and tropical plants which are showy and unique. And this ‘Black Pearl’ pepper fits the bill.

Black Pearl in Pot

By the way, it is also a Proven Winners plant and can take full sun to part sun or part shade. It worked so well with my heat loving Canna plants and never showed any signs of weakness or poor growth – it can take the heat – and because the peppers are very hot to eat, the critters in my yard didn’t dare take a bite.

Benefits of Using Edibles with Ornamental Values

Benefits of Using Edibles with Ornamental Values

My husband, Steve, however did try to eat a pepper from this plant one afternoon. He was quick to spit it out of his mouth – It was too hot to bear. So if you are brave, you may want to try it or use it as an ornamental feature in your patio pots and container gardens.

There are so many benefits to using this plant in container gardens: very long lasting, has a wonderful shape which adds another dimension to your design, it is easy to grow, dark foliage, transitioning colors with the pepper’s change from black to red, and makes a nice filler position in a container garden or patio pot.

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Happy Friday Everyone – and I have a few seats open for Saturday’s class if interested, just e-me, text, or call.
Would love to have you join us.

Cathy Testa
(860) 977-9473
containercathy@gmail.com

Container Crazy CT