Trailing Red Small Daisy Flowers that can Take it Rough

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I am always in search of tough (as in tolerant) plants for container gardens and patio pots for full sun locations due to having a few clients with these environmental conditions at their outdoor settings. In fact, I often refer to the location as “full on sun” when I talk to my husband about it, and he jokes about that term to this day. It is a hot location with lots of heat in the midst of summer with limited water sources outdoors. Thus, I like plants to be drought tolerant if possible.

Last year, I happen to notice an annual plant at a local nursery with light green and white succulent like foliage, and thought this may be a candidate for my full sun project because the succulent foliage led me to believe it probably is similar to a succulent plants (able to retain water in its leaves and are drought tolerant) but I wasn’t sure.

However, despite not knowing the plant’s requirements as of yet, I also noticed it blooms small red flowers and I was in search a red and yellow combinations for a theme I was planning on this site that year. I looked at the label, of course, and thought it over and decided to give this annual plant a try.

‘Mezoo Trailing Red’ is the Tradename

A Spiller in Habit

In addition to having the succulent like foliage, the hot red colored blooms are what I was searching for, and having a bit of an unusual variegated foliage coloring, it also would work as a spiller plant (plants which trail or hang down in planters and pots). I grabbed a couple to add to my selections to plant in some large long planters. And, also, it has a lighter tone of a foliage color, making good contrast to darker plants.

‘Mezoo Trailing Red’

It is known as ‘Mezoo Trailing Red’ as the tradename, but upon some research, I discovered it’s botanical name is, Dorotheanthus bellidiformis. Try pronouncing that one! So, I will just refer to it as “trailing red” or “Mezoo” in this post. It is a tender perennial that is winter hardy to planting zones 9-10, but here in Connecticut, it is treated as a annual plant and is not hardy in our CT zones. I’m in Zone 6b.

Easy to Root

However, I discovered yet another benefit about this plant, it is easy to root from a tip cutting by placing it in a jar of water and letting roots form from the stem end tip. I did that after the summer with some cuttings and managed to start a couple smaller plant to keep in the house over the winter.

Great with Darker Contrasts nearby (dark greens), and also looks nice with soft blues!

Blue Green Coloring

There are different types of green and the foliage green on ‘trailing red’ is a bit of a blue green with hues of white to creamy white edges on the leaves. I thought how it seemed to click in color with a few blue Senecio plants I had to plant as well, which I used a little fillers to tuck in next to the Mezoo trailing red plant. However, by the end of the summer, Mezoo took over the area in the center of this tall and long planter. The Senecio got crowded out quickly. I didn’t mind, however, because Mezoo turned out to be just beautiful and full to the max.

Abundant Growth

The amount of growth that occurred in one summer in the planters really shocked me when I returned later in the season to take a look at the plants. The Mezoo was lush, full, and trailing over the edge down to the middle of a 5-6 foot tall square planter. There were no signs of insects and about the only issue I had with it was as some of the leaves dried up here and there (just a bit), the dried up papery residue of the leaves stuck to the outside of the planter under the plant’s hanging foliage and blooms. I washed that up later off the planter, when I took the Mezoo out of the planter, before fall arrived, by using some mild soapy dish type water. I was glad the planter’s outside covering was not damaged.

Drought Tolerant

This is the type of plant that tolerates some dry periods as well, which is a bonus. It is low maintenance and takes somewhat dry to medium moisture. Well-drained soil is preferred by it, and I had placed between two dark green globe shaped shrubs and thus, the plant was somewhat protected, but I don’t think it needed any extra protection. It grew massive and was impressive. It dripped over both sides of the planter, to about half-way down. I was impressed. Take note, it doesn’t like to stay completely dry and fortunately, we had good rainfall to get some moisture into the soil in the planter that year.

Overflowing Abundance

Like a Waterfall

Just look at this photo above. It is very apparent this plant was thriving. It was full, lush, bursting with foliage and flowing thru the two side shrubs like a waterfall. When I saw this abundance of growth, I said an, “Oooohh, so nice!” comment out loud to myself, which is typical of me. I surprise myself sometimes. LOL. I was pleased.

When I got back to my greenhouse, from digging it out at the site, I decided to take a few cuttings (as noted above) and showed it to my plant followers, and immediately a friend and plant enthusiast chimed in to say she has one as well and loves how well it performs in her hanging baskets at home. She also takes tip cuttings to root as a method to save some over the winter months here in Connecticut.

Sometimes its worth a shot to try out a plant you are unfamiliar with and often they will give you clues to their habit and tolerance. This one I would definitely recommend for sunny locations in containers and patio pots. It handled the heat, wind, sun, limited watering, and crowding between two other plants pretty well. It has a lower habit (doesn’t grow upwards), so if you don’t want to block the view behind it, which we didn’t want to block the skyline, it worked very well and I experienced no insect issues on it all summer long. I will say, we did have more moisture than usual that summer and maybe that helped, but overall, it can take it rough.

Mezoo used on a Succulent Pumpkin Centerpiece by Cathy Testa of Container Crazy CT

Blooms are Small but Long Lasting

It also blooms many daisy red small flowers from about June up to October. The flowers do not fall off so no worries about a mess on the ground area and also no worries about deadheading. I do wish the flowers were larger however.

Later in the autumn season, I ended up tucking some of those cuttings I took on top of my succulent topped pumpkin centerpieces. I guess the bonus list continued onward. It just hit me how they would look pretty on my pumpkins.

Dripping over the edge of a long square planter

Benefits Reviewed

  • Dry to medium moisture (somewhat drought tolerant; don’t allow soil to completely dry out)
  • Likes heat and can take the heat
  • A spiller that cascades over pots (but has a low mat forming habit)
  • Easy to take tip cuttings to root in water
  • Full sun lover
  • Low maintenance, no deadheading required
  • Can take average well-draining soils
  • Makes a decent winter houseplant
  • Pairs well with succulents
  • Not a high feeder
  • And well, lastly, I liked using the cuttings on my pumpkins as noted above!

Thank you for visiting!

Cathy Testa
Broad Brook/East Windsor, CT
Zone 6b
Container Garden Designer
Posted: 1/18/2022

Side View – Container Gardens by Cathy Testa of Container Crazy CT in Broad Brook, Connecticut

Sunny Hill Side Gardening – Our Next Walk n Talk Hour – This Saturday!

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Hi Everyone,

Our next Walk and Talk Garden Event is scheduled for this Saturday, August 16th, at 10:00 am to 11:00 am in East Granby, Connecticut.  It will showcase a sunny hill side garden area facing an amazing view of the mountains beyond, and includes a discussion on what has thrived on a difficult hill facing the afternoon sun and wind during both the summer and winter months.

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There are many plants which this homeowner has grown in these harsh conditions, and her style is very informal and meadow like.  She also has an amazing curly willow on her property you must see.  She collects the branches in the winter for decorations.

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Other interesting activities she deals with are bears!  They roam through her gardens from time to time, and her dog was a watcher of these, but sadly her beloved pet passed two years ago.

A View Tax

The most amazing thing of all is the view from her gardens and home – it is breathtaking, in fact, she has to pay a “view tax” which she debated with the town in the past.  Seems unfair to be taxed on a view – doesn’t it? LOL.

Let’s learn about how she deals with all this during our Walk and Talk on Saturday, August 16th at 10 am.

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After the Tour – Visit Some Local Nurseries

After our one hour Walk and Talk, there are two nurseries close by you may opt to visit.  One is Bosco’s Garden Center in Simsbury, located only a couple miles from our Walk and Talk address.  Bosco’s is open from 9 am to 5 pm on Saturdays. It is a small nursery with a little area to the side of its main building and a back area but it has great plants.  Their adjoining shop has some adorable garden decor and other various plant products.

If you still want to adventure on after Bosco’s, another choice is O’Brien Nursery in Granby, CT which is located about 3-4 miles from Bosco’s.  This nursery features “Open Garden Days” and lucky for us – this weekend is one of them.  They are offering a ‘Hosta Dividing Demo’ at noon, so if you time this right – you can go see the demo after our Walk and Talk, or just visit their nursery packed with various hosta plants, and other interesting plants.

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Directions

To receive directions to the Walk and Talk location, respond in the “comments” section on this blog post (see RED Box on top right), or email containercathy@gmail.com, or sign up via the Facebook posted event.  Feel free to text if you prefer to 860-977-9473.  Only signed-up attendees receive the home address of the event.  Oh, another way to sign up is to complete the Contact Form below.

The directions to both nearby nurseries will be handed out at our Walk and Talk and we will give you some recommendations of local restaurants as well.  Documentation on heat tolerant and drought tolerant plants will be furnished to attendees.

All Walk and Talks are free to attend.  See ground rules here.

ePub on Designing Hills

To see an article written back in 2010 on Designing Hills, check out Cathy T’s website here.  But, let me just say, the hostess of our Walk and Talk Event doesn’t always follow “design” rules, but follows her gut and individual style.  She has several plants to talk about which have tolerated her tough conditions and she will let us know what she has done to help with the dry and windy situations.

Gardens at this time of year may be stressed from summer heat – but her situation is even more intense due to the hill side and how it faces the landscape – so if you have similar challenges and wish to compare notes – this is a Walk and Talk you don’t want to miss – and it is last one scheduled for the 2014 season.

2015 Walk and Talk Dates

We have several 2015 Walk and Talk Events already scheduled. To receive notifications of them, be sure to “follow” this blog. Also, don’t be shy – if you would like to share your gardening experience in a very informal yet informative way – be sure to let us know – we love meeting new gardeners and walk away every time with something new to try as we learn practiced techniques from homeowners.

Lucky for us – the weather is again predicted to be very nice on Saturday – so don’t miss out – you never know what kind of “goodies” you will walk away with at this event!

Thank you – Cathy Testa
http://www.cathytesta.com
ContainerCrazyCT

Visit Cathy T’s Pinboards on Pinterest

To see many examples of Hill Side Gardens, visit http://www.pinterest.com/cathytesta/slopes-n-hill-n-terraces.  Click the Pinterest icon on the right side bar of this blog to get there quick.

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